Tomato Seeds - Tomatillos Hover over to zoom, click to enlarge
£2.49
Tomato Seeds - Tomatillos Tomato Seeds - Tomatillos

Tomato Seeds - Tomatillos

Physalis philadelphica

Developed by James Wong - Vigorous, high yielding plants. Perfect in salsas, sauces and guacamoles. Very similar to its relative, the tomato, but even easier to grow. Harvest fruit at any size larger than a walnut, whilst still green. Tastes like: tomato & lime. Latin Name: Physalis philadelphica.

Sealed inside their own little paper envelopes, these round, green tomato-like fruit were once actually more popular than tomatoes themselves amongst the Aztecs of their native Mexico. They are freshingly fruity and taste weirdly like a cross between a lime and beefsteak tomato.

Far easier to grow and immeasurably more productive than a lowly tomato, there is no excuse why every fajita fan shouldn’t make space for a couple of these too! Sow: March-April. Harvest: August-October.

 

 

Price:£2.49
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Delivery: Delivery within 7 days
Code: 182491 Add to Wishlist
Average Packet Content 25 seeds
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Flower/Harvest
Flower / Fruit from August-October
 
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Grow your own edible explosives! Tomatoes that come in their own chinese lanterns

Developed by James Wong - Vigorous, high yielding plants. Perfect in salsas, sauces and guacamoles. Very similar to its relative, the tomato, but even easier to grow. Harvest fruit at any size larger than a walnut, whilst still green. Tastes like: tomato & lime. Latin Name: Physalis philadelphica.

Sealed inside their own little paper envelopes, these round, green tomato-like fruit were once actually more popular than tomatoes themselves amongst the Aztecs of their native Mexico. They are freshingly fruity and taste weirdly like a cross between a lime and beefsteak tomato.

Far easier to grow and immeasurably more productive than a lowly tomato, there is no excuse why every fajita fan shouldn’t make space for a couple of these too! Sow: March-April. Harvest: August-October.

 

 

Colour:Green

Hardiness:0 degrees

Resistance to Disease:False

Seeds:True

Bulbs:False

Shrubs:False

Tree:False

Plants:False

Aftercare - Easy:False

Aftercare - Moderate:False

Aftercare - High:False

Scented:False

Height:91-100cm

Cut Flower:False

Edible Flower:False

Spread:51-60cm

Organic:False

Good For Dried Flowers:False

Drought Resistant:False

RHS Award of Garden Merit:False

Vegetables recommended by the NIAB:False

Award Winners in Fleuroselect Trials:False

Likes Acidic Soil:False

Containers:False

Hanging Baskets:False

Beds & Borders:True

Rockeries:False

Climbers:False

Greenhouse, Glass House or Home:True

Prefers Full Sun:True

Grows in Sun or Partial Shade:False

Grows in Sun or Shade:False

Partial or Full Shade:False

Shade:False

F1 Variety:False

Hardy Annual:False

Half Hardy Annual:False

Greenhouse Annual:False

Hardy Biennial:False

Greenhouse Biennial:False

Hardy Perennial:False

Tender Perennial:False

Half Hardy Perennial:False

Greenhouse Perennial:False

Shrub:False

Butterflies:False

Birds:False

Bees:False

Full growing instructions given on packet. Sow the seeds in shallow trays of compost in a propagator or on a sunny windowsill in March, potting them on into small pots when they get to about 5cm (2") high. Transfer them into their final growing positions outdoors in late May/June when frost danger has passed. These vigorous plants do best in full sun in a warm, sheltered position, set about 1m (40") apart to allow them space to branch out. You will probably only need 2 plants for the average family, as they are extremely high-yielding, however do not plant any less as tomatillo bushes need a friend nearby to ensure effective pollination. When your Tomatillos get to around 30cm (12") tall they will begin to flop on their sides, losing their neat upright shape. This is a natural phase of their development, in which the central stem flops down in contact with the soil and sends out loads of lateral roots, followed by heavy fruit-producing shoots. Your plants will produce at least 4 or 5 times more fruit on these lateral branches. If possible grow your plants in open ground rather than pots if you have that option, to allow them space to spread out over the ground. They respond well to a high potash feed, producing even higher yields of fruit. Tomatillos are ready to harvest at any stage between walnut and medium tomato size; when they start to split their lantern-like casings but are still green. Each plant is capable of producing up to an astonishing 10 kilos (22lbs) of fruit per plant before the first frosts!

EATING: Tomatillos are incredibly versatile and can be used largely in similar ways to regular tomatoes, bearing in mind however that they are slightly more tart and do not contain as much sugar. Probably the most common way to serve these in Mexico is in spicy salsa verde (literally meaning ‘green sauce’), which seems to be served with everything from being stuffed into quesadillas to doused over fried chicken. To harvest the fruit, remove the husks and wash under warm water to remove the bitter waxy coating prior to eating or cooking.

RECIPES:

Salsa Verde - Either boil whole or sliced in half and sear in a hot frying pan until their skins blacken. Peel the fruits and whizz the flesh up with green chillies, raw onions, a twist of lime, a pinch of salt and lashings of fresh coriander.

Tomatillo Marinade - This salsa verde mix makes a brilliant overnight marinade for grilled fish, prawns or chicken at your next BBQ, with just the addition of a good glug of olive oil.

Mexican Baked Haddock in Tomatillo & Sour Cream Sauce - Simmer the salsa verde mix with some good quality fish stock, a few spoonfuls of rich sour cream & thicken with a little cornflour. Pour this over a tray of haddock, sprinkle with cheese and bake in a medium oven for 20 minutes to make a delicious main course. Serve with rice, black beans and a tall margarita!

Tomatillo Chicken Soup - Slice up a cup of the little green fruit with a large onion, 4 cloves of garlic, 1 green chilli and simmer these all in a litre of good quality chicken stock until tender. Puree the whole lot and serve in warm bowls with shredded chicken, finely diced red onion, some pickled jalapeno rings and a hefty handful of corn chips crumbled over the top.

At Suttons we take food sensitivity seriously. If you are unsure you may be allergic to any varieties in the James Wong range, please take the precaution of seeking medical advice.

 

 

Suttons Seeds

All Suttons products should reach you in perfect condition, just as they left us. If you are dissatisfied in any way with their condition on arrival, please let us know within 14 days. We are only liable for the cost of the goods as quoted on the website plus the cost of delivery if the goods are faulty.

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