Japanese Beefsteak Plant Seeds Hover over to zoom, click to enlarge
£2.49
Japanese Beefsteak Plant Seeds Japanese Beefsteak Plant Seeds Japanese Beefsteak Plant Seeds

Japanese Beefsteak Plant Seeds

James Wong's Homegrown Revolution

Part of the James Wong Homegrown Revolution Range.

Frilly, colourful foliage. A savoury, spicy ingredient. Delicious addition to oriental cooking. Tastes like Cumin, salty, roast beef.
Already a hugely popular bedding plant known for its frilly, colourful foliage, it is surprising that no one knows that these young leaves are edible. Scatter a few of these plants through your flower border for a savoury, spicy ingredient that will happily sit incognito amongst your herbaceous perennials. Sowing: March-April. Harvest: June-October.

Price:£2.49
Qty:
Delivery: Delivery within 7 days
Code: 147040 Add to Wishlist
Average Packet Content 180 seeds
Add to Basket

At a glance

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Sow
Flower/Harvest
Sowing Time March-April Flower / Fruit from June-October
 
  • Product Detail
  • Hints & Tips
  • Reviews
  • Guarantee

Giant colourful nettles with a flavour that lives up to their name

Part of the James Wong Homegrown Revolution Range.

Frilly, colourful foliage. A savoury, spicy ingredient. Delicious addition to oriental cooking. Tastes like Cumin, salty, roast beef.
Already a hugely popular bedding plant known for its frilly, colourful foliage, it is surprising that no one knows that these young leaves are edible. Scatter a few of these plants through your flower border for a savoury, spicy ingredient that will happily sit incognito amongst your herbaceous perennials. Sowing: March-April. Harvest: June-October.

Full growing instructions given on packet. Sow your seeds in shallow trays of compost in a propagator, or on a sunny windowsill late March, potting them on into small pots when they get to about 5cm (2") high & finally transplanting them into their final growing positions outdoors in late May/June. These plants grow big so it is a good idea to site them towards the back of your border so they don’t shade out your smaller plants. They like a site with full sun and rich, well-drained soil. Pick off any flower buds that appear throughout the summer, to divert the plant’s energy into producing the maximum amount of leaves. However, lay off this from September to allow the plants the chance to set seed, seeding themselves freely in the soil around them.

Hardiness:-5 degrees

Resistance to Disease:False

Seeds:True

Bulbs:False

Shrubs:False

Tree:False

Plants:False

Aftercare - Easy:True

Aftercare - Moderate:False

Aftercare - High:False

Scented:False

Height:91-100CM

Spread:21-30CM

Organic:False

Good For Dried Flowers:False

Drought Resistant:False

RHS Award of Garden Merit:False

Vegetables recommended by the NIAB:False

Award Winners in Fleuroselect Trials:False

Containers:False

Hanging Baskets:False

Beds & Borders:True

Rockeries:False

Climbers:False

Greenhouse, Glass House or Home:True

Prefers Full Sun:True

Grows in Sun or Shade:False

Partial or Full Shade:False

Shade:False

F1 Variety:False

Hardy Annual:False

Half Hardy Annual:True

Greenhouse Annual:False

Hardy Biennial:False

Greenhouse Biennial:False

Hardy Perennial:False

Tender Perennial:False

Half Hardy Perennial:False

Greenhouse Perennial:False

Shrub:False

Butterflies:False

Birds:False

Bees:False

EATING: With a rich cumin-like flavour and overtones of cinnamon and coriander, the Japanese Beefsteak Plant leaves add a wonderfully savoury meatiness to all sorts of dishes, both as a garnish or finely chopped and stirred through for the last few minutes of cooking. Stuff the leaves with slices of lime into the cavity of a fish before roasting, chop them up finely and stir into marinades for strips of beef or chicken before chucking them into a stir fry, or simply chop them up finely and stir into hot steamed rice. Their deep burgundy colour is so intense that they are also used to make a fluorescent pink dye in Japan - employed to colour everything from those crunchy pickled daikon cubes you see in bento boxes, to that sliced pink ginger that always accompanies sushi.

RECIPE:
Mixed vegetable tempura with cinnamon salt - Encased in crisp tempura batter, this is a satisfying treat. I use sweet potatoes and figs but peppers, mushrooms and aubergines will work brilliantly too.For the dipping sauce -
• 2 tbsp Japanese soy sauce
• 1cm piece of fresh ginger, finely grated
• Finely grated zest of half an orange
• ½ tsp Sichuan peppercorns
• Small pinch of ground chilli
• 15ml mirin
• Vegetable oil, for deep-frying
• 125ml sesame oil, for deep-frying
• 1 egg
• 1 small bottle of soda water, ice cold
• 75g plain white flour
• 75g cornflour
• selection of various vegetables, sliced
• 10 Japanese beefsteak plant leaves
• ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
• ¼ tsp ground cinnamon
• ¼ tsp salt
METHOD: In a small saucepan add the soy sauce, ginger, orange, peppercorns, chilli and mirin. Heat over a low heat and gently simmer for 5 minutes. Set aside to cool.
In a small bowl, mix together the ground cinnamon and sea salt and set aside. Fill a large saucepan o

Suttons Seeds

All Suttons products should reach you in perfect condition, just as they left us. If you are dissatisfied in any way with their condition on arrival, please let us know within 14 days. We are only liable for the cost of the goods as quoted on the website plus the cost of delivery if the goods are faulty.

Top